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Doce me faces voluntarem tuam quia Deus meus es tu

Wednesday, August 27, 2003
E-mail can be sent here.
4:53 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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Some talk over at The Corner about Hillary Rodham Clinton making a run for the White House. I wouldn't run it out, but I don't believe for one second that it would be a positive thing for the Dems.

Unadulterated, unmitigated disaster.

I don't believe that fringe Left would fall behind the Clinton machine, especially once Dean and Kucinich have been told by the DNC that they won't work. Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, et al., will have a field day. Yeah, her book sold well, but does anyone really believe that mainstream America - flyover country - cares about Hillary? Yeah, that's what I thought. A reader sent a comment to the Corner suggesting former Gen. Wesley Clark as a potential VP. Supposedly he'll work well in the South. Correct me if I'm wrong, but Southern candidates that work do so because they have Good Ol' Boy appeal. You can look at the candidate and tell that he'd be a good hunting/fishing/golf buddy. A pompous man from Atlanta wouldn't mean anything to a Southerner if he wouldn't be comfortable spending a summer in Pensecola and Gulf Shores, or a week at a West Alabama hunting cabin.
3:07 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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Harrison Ford chimes in with his take on American foreign policy. Yippee. I'm sure he knows so much about the subject, what with his busy schedule of putting out great movies like Hollywood Homicide.

To be fair, he wasn't mean-spirited in his ignorance.

Sean Hannity no doubt will gripe about this, but I'm not so sure it's worth getting riled up over. In an actor's downtime, they're not always doing media spots. If they make it overseas, the foreign press is always tossing out questions about the U.S. government, so I'm not surprised that comments like this come up while celebrities are 'cross the pond. That doesn't excuse poor logic and weak historical knowledge, but it's a point to consider.

Anyway, if Aragorn was to be an anti-war activist, then I'm not surprised that Han Solo is, as well.
2:53 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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More on Judge Moore.

While I really agree with the legal aspects that Quinn Hillyer brought up in yesterday's NRO article, I can't help but have some of John Derbyshire's feelings. What difference does it make? I know a lot of Christians feel that Moore is embarassing (I sympathize, believe me), but there's a very serious legal debate here.

There's always been a group of Christians who felt that all the Church's work was done face-to-face, person-to-person. I agree. Yet it would be foolhardy to ignore the fact there is a very vocal minority in this country that would prefer to see all religion relegated to people's living rooms, and no shade of faith remaining in the public realm. This is a bad idea.

I repeat, this is a bad idea.

Christians can stick their head in the sand and try to pretend this isn't happening, or that it doesn't matter. That's suicide. Europe has become a purely secular society, and much of that culture is gone. Not just the devotion to Christianity, but a great deal of the art, the music, and the literature that made Europe the envy of the world.

"And some things,
that should not
have been forgotten,
were lost...

History became legend,
legend became myth..."

In America, if the Judeo-Christian traditions are to go, the rest of the culture is soon to follow.
1:23 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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Monday, August 25, 2003
This is why I'm outraged.

3:16 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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A few thoughts on Guv'nah Riley's new tax plan.

Perhaps the driving idea behind the plan is that it's time for corporations in the state to pay their "fair share" of taxes. That's where things start to get muddy for me. What, exactly, is a "fair share" of taxes? There's too much theory involved in that, I suppose, for Riley and his supporters.

I've lived in the state of Alabama for a very long time. Education in this state is by no means perfect, and I'll agree that it needs work. But why is it so difficult for someone, anyone - the Guv, the State Superintendent of Education, the janitor at the State House - to show the people of Alabama the state budget. How much money is coming in? Where's it coming from? Where is it appropriated, by whom, and then where is it going once it gets out of Montgomery and into the hands of county and local city governments?

The city of Birmingham has schools that are in shambles. Yet at last check, the system's superintendent was making over $200,000 a year. I realize that a strong salary is required to maintain quality employees, but give me a break. I went to a not great, but better than average public high school in one of the largest county systems in the state. If Riley's tax plan passes, and my old teachers get a raise, does that mean that suddenly the classes will become tougher, the standards greater, and the drive to teach and learn stronger?

I'm not holding my breath.

Vote no. If the public has to tighten its financial belt, so should the government.

E-mail here: mattcrashblog@hotmail.com
12:30 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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Quin Hillyer of the Mobile Register has this to say about the Roy Moore fiasco.

I couldn't agree more.

On the other hand, THE DERB has this to say about the whole mess. He makes a good point. It's sort of like the Trent Lott debacle a while back. Was the Left over-reacting? Yep, they sure were. Was Lott gravely wrong? You bet. It's a shame, really. The biggest church/state case in years comes along, and the man waving the banner is a yokel of the highest order. I think Derbyshire's point shouldn't be neglected, but I can't in good faith defend Roy Moore.

Maybe it all goes back to that issue of metropolitian conservatism that Derbyshire brought up on NRO a while back. Big-city cons don't always understand what goes on in flyover country, and vice versa.

Food for though, ah reckon.
10:52 AM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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Saturday, August 23, 2003
Just a few thoughts on Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore.

First, a little clarification. I'm a Christian. A conservative. A conservative Christian.

With that out of the way, Moore's an idiot. This is just embarrassing. Look, I'm the first to get irate when the ACLU fires off a lawsuit at some podunk town with a nativity scene on the front lawn of City Hall. I don't believe that the 1st Amendment means religion has no place in public life. I'm constantly disgusted that the Left wants religion relegated to living rooms and Sunday School. At the same time, what's Moore attempting to accomplish? Yes, the 10 Commandments is part of our legal heritage, even if people like this are otherwise persuaded. So why not a big statue of the Magna Carta? Why install the monument in the middle of the night, in secrecy? What does Moore have to hide?

Everything, apparently.

I firmly believe that religion has a place in public life. I believe that the Judeo-Christian worldview played a crucial, though not exclusive, role in the creation of the United States. But the Bible places no expectation on the secular state to spread the Gospel. That's the job of Christians, working on their own, to develop relationships. It's not the job of politicians.

Moore's an embarrassment to me as an Alabamian and a Christian.

More on this topic, for sure...
8:11 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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I've been sick this week. So I was at home, re-reading some old issues of some punk fanzines. Ok, it's nothing new to know that the punk/hardcore community is way to the left of most of society. Everyone's attacking corporate America, Bush is bad, yada yada yada. But is it possible to concede that it's easier for a corporation to make cars and dvd players? I don't want some dude in a suit putting out my favorite records, either, but let's not throw the baby out with the bathwater.

In other news, college football gets underway today. The real fun starts next week. I, for one, can't wait.
5:18 PM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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Thursday, August 14, 2003
Guv'nah Bob Riley, a Republican, has a new tax proposal set to go before the people for a vote on September 9. The new proposal would mean a readjustment in the state's antiquated tax structure. Problem is, he's raising lots of taxes, and the money goes into one of those lovely slush funds. A friend sent this report suggesting that maybe the taxes woes of the Great State of Alabama aren't all they're cracked up to be.

Also, e-mail can be sent here.

More later, I'm sure.
7:55 AM :: ::

Matt :: permalink


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