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Doce me faces voluntarem tuam quia Deus meus es tu

Monday, March 27, 2006
When I hear Derek Webb and Don Miller talk about starting Christian peace studies, I can't help but wonder if they mean groups like the Christian Peacemaker Teams.

This is a nice summary of the CPT's actions in recent weeks.
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Matt :: permalink


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Thursday, March 23, 2006
Good news, indeed.
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Matt :: permalink


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Wednesday, March 22, 2006
I'm avoiding politics right now, mostly to help clear my mind while trying to write a paper about Confederate discontent aimed at General Braxton Bragg.

I think I shall entitle the paper "To Live in Discontent."

Nice, huh?

Things are quiet lately. Lots of good talks with my fiance, about all sorts of matters. A clean apartment, allowing me to think just a bit better. Walks outside under train tressles to dams and dirty rivers. It's like an AVAIL song, only my jeans do not have holes.

I'm thinking of writing a bit on the rock bands that have really and truly been the most important to me. Rock music is, in many ways, a superficial thing, some existential boast about the frailty of youth. And yet it sticks with us for longer than we might expect. I will devote some time to this in the coming days.

For now, my playlist is:

M. Ward - Transistor Radio
Fugazi - Red Medicine
Songs: Ohia - Aces and Axxess
The Evens - s/t
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Matt :: permalink


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Tuesday, March 21, 2006
Partially out of boredom and partially out of necessity, I'm really going to lay off the politics around here for the next month or so. School work is piling up, so I've not got the time to fuss of political nitpickings.

Let me say this: Fugazi is still an amazing band.

Maybe I'll do a top ten list later.
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Matt :: permalink


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Sunday, March 19, 2006
Has anyone heard the new Neko Case record?

Can someone recommend some good new hip-hop?

And tough break for the Tide. Dick Enberg should retire.

This young spots blogger
will be very, very good before it's all said and done.
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Matt :: permalink


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Tuesday, March 14, 2006
Jollyblogger posts on American religion, with an interesting link to some thoughts on Brennan Manning. Worth reading, whether we agree or disagree.
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Matt :: permalink


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In the comments to a post at his Reformissionary site, Steve McCoy poses the following:

"To be honest, I think one could simply know Christ crucified and in that knowledge sustain quite a critique of any political ideology. It sounds like you would disagree."

Perhaps.

I may in fact agree, if we mean that a believer could, with an understanding of the Gospel, critique human nature, understanding that man is a fallen, flawed creature prone to all sorts of mischief. I would suggest that a traditional understanding of orthodox Christianity would produce something of a reasonable critique of much politics. Having said that, I cannot help but think of all the political chaos that erupted throughout Europe during the Reformation, when men thought they and their Bibles could, with no help from their ancestors, order a just society. It did not work.

I will spend more time on this in the coming week, but this is why I am a political conservative in the spirit of Buckley, Kirk and Burke. Liberalism, at its core, suggests that human problems can be solved. Conservatism suggests the opposite, that sinful men cannot be good as a result of some government action, for the government in and of itself will thus be flawed. The goal of government, then, is to make every effort for men to live in virtue, while never coercing them. The job of government is to simply make it easier. Liberalism has stood in the way of action for decades.

My issues with Don Miller can be dealt with later, but I can assure you they are not as virulent as some of the more rabid TRs in the blogosphere. I would simply challenge Miller's approach to faith and politics, suggesting that his means of doing so are well-intended, but with poor consequences. I do not intend to make any pronouncements on the man's faith.
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Matt :: permalink


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Saturday, March 11, 2006
In a post remembering the evangelical scholar Ronald Nash, Russell Moore says this:

"The issue was lost at the point of whether God had spoken; indeed, whether he could speak. I think of this insight often when I see younger evangelicals, including some Southern Baptists, falling for the absurdly postmodern emo-liberalism of the "emerging church" wind of doctrine now sweeping through evangelical dorm rooms and blog sites."


I'm a bit conflicted here. I can sympathize with the emerging idea of doing church differently or being, for lack of a different term, relevant to our culture. And yet I find Brian McLaren to be downright disturbing. And even if Blue Like Jazz is a nice retelling of Don Miller's journey with Jesus, I can't overlook the fact that he's using his position to promote the inane babblings of a loon like Cornel West. Surely someone out there can do this sort of writing without serving as a mouthpiece for that sort of nonsense.

Then again, maybe not.
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Matt :: permalink


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Wednesday, March 01, 2006
Hugh Hewitt reminds me that Christopher Hitchens is still the best.

I'll be in Nashville this weekend. Anyone know a good coffeeshop or lunch spot? Vegetarian-friendly, of course.
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Matt :: permalink


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